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Thursday, 27 October 2011 02:25

Finding Your Career

I happened across this short article when doing some studying for a class. Thought it had some pretty good career advice! I feel pretty lucky, like I have found my career "Sweet Spot" as a geek.

 


Finding Your Career "Sweet Spot"

By D. Quinn Mills

We increase the likelihood of advancing in our careers if we can bring together what motivates us (our passion) and what we are good at (our capabilities). We call this intersection in a person's career one's "sweet spot."

Unfortunately, it may prove difficult to find our sweet spot because we may not be good at something that we feel passionate about. There are areas that some of us may have passion for - art, music, dance, sports, food, entertaining - but it is often more difficult for a person to develop a full-fledged career in these areas.

One way to help bring the two together is to try to obtain the skills and capabilities necessary to succeed in something that we're passionate about. Sometimes we rush to find a job that is in our sweet spot, but cannot, because we haven't the skills to match to our passion. In such cases, it's better to invest the time in acquiring the skills necessary to do well in something we care about, and then look for the perfect match.

Many people go into consulting early in their careers for this very reason. In consulting a person can pick up a wide variety of skills, and develop abilities and personal contacts that will help one get a position in a particular industry.

Looking for job passion

Another partial step that may be possible for many of us is to find an element of our jobs that we are passionate about. For example, a manager in a health services firm might not be particularly passionate about the administrative work, travel, and internal politics, but he might have considerable passion about saving lives with the company's medical devices.

In some instances it may take a long time to find a career that matches our sweet spots. But as long as we keep this goal in mind as we pursue our career paths, many of us will eventually come across a job that comes close to our own personal special intersection of passion and competence.

For some of us there will never be an intersection of passion and competence in the work environment. But all is not lost.

First, many people take jobs that have no relation to their passions. They expect to dislike the job immensely, but instead end up loving the job. Why? Because of the people and the teams they work with, because of the positive culture of the firm, and because of the energy of the place. While they may not be working in an industry whose products they love, they've found passion for their jobs nonetheless.

For many of us, finding this sort of passion at work, regardless of the industry, might be a more plausible way to embrace our sweet spots. In this situation, the sweet spot is a working environment that motivates us.

For example, a young man has spent a bit of time working in a capital markets role. Although he doesn't love the hours or sometimes the companies he works with, he does enjoy the excitement of doing a deal. The fun he has - and the enjoyment he receives from the environment - compensate him for the parts of the job that he doesn't enjoy as much.

D. Quinn Mills is the Alfred J. Weatherhead Jr. Professor of Business Administration emeritus at Harvard Business School. He consults with major corporations and teaches on subjects of leadership, strategy, and financial investments.

Copyright © 2007 D. Quinn Mills

 

Published in Minutia
Saturday, 22 October 2011 02:12

A VETERAN IS ...

A person who pledged their very life in defense of the Constitution of the United States

Someone who endured environmental and physical extremes while battling foreign and domestic enemies of the Constitution

A person whose fidelity and loyalty to the Constitution remains ever strong

FuneralImageA person who has gone into the Valley of Death in obedience to lawful orders of the President and of superior officers

A person who voluntarily gave up their Constitutional freedoms and became subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice

A person who asks to give but never to be given

A person who may be a recipient of but never sought a citation for bravery

One who proudly salutes the Anthem and Flag of the United States of America

One who protects the loathsome protestor’s freedom of speech and right to burn the Flag

A person who is blind to human differences and accepts the strength of diversity

A person who never was and is not now a victim

The only one who is capable of truly understanding another Veteran

One who does not ask to be understood but for others to be understanding

That person sitting alone, looking into the past with eyes full of tears, asking the unanswerable, "Why not me?"

With love and respect for my brothers and sisters

Terry S. Bowman,
SMSgt (Ret) USAF

Thanks Fran for sending this to me. I couldn't have said this better myself! Thank you SMSgt Bowman for the inspired words and thank you to all the military members (current and former) who have voluntarily accepted the call to duty and to those who have given the greatest sacrifice for the good of the rest of us! Confused

Published in Awesomeness